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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - view in Great Expectations
1  The Castle battlements arose upon my view at eight o'clock.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
2  An open door afforded a perspective view of the Aged in bed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
3  A great event in my life, the turning point of my life, now opens on my view.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
4  By and by, I noticed Wemmick's arm beginning to disappear again, and gradually fading out of view.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
5  But, morning once more brightened my view, and I extended my clemency to Biddy, and we dropped the subject.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
6  But I saw that everything within my view which ought to be white, had been white long ago, and had lost its lustre and was faded and yellow.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
7  Lastly, as he had not yet been seen by the laundress or her niece, he was to keep himself out of their view until his change of dress was made.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
8  She had her back towards me, and held her pretty brown hair spread out in her two hands, and never looked round, and passed out of my view directly.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
9  The pupils then entered among themselves upon a competitive examination on the subject of Boots, with the view of ascertaining who could tread the hardest upon whose toes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
10  It was an unhappy life that I lived; and its one dominant anxiety, towering over all its other anxieties, like a high mountain above a range of mountains, never disappeared from my view.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVII
11  But when, in the clearer light of next morning, I began to reconsider the matter and to hear it discussed around me on all sides, I took another view of the case, which was more reasonable.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
12  After this escape, I was content to take a foggy view of the Inn through the window's encrusting dirt, and to stand dolefully looking out, saying to myself that London was decidedly overrated.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
13  I found the same gate open, and I explored the garden, and even looked in at the windows of the detached house; but my view was suddenly stopped by the closed shutters within, and all was lifeless.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
14  Mr. Wopsle had in his hand the affecting tragedy of George Barnwell, in which he had that moment invested sixpence, with the view of heaping every word of it on the head of Pumblechook, with whom he was going to drink tea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
15  Mr. Camilla interposing, as Mrs. Camilla laid her hand upon her heaving bosom, that lady assumed an unnatural fortitude of manner which I supposed to be expressive of an intention to drop and choke when out of view, and kissing her hand to Miss Havisham, was escorted forth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
16  I remember that at a later period of my "time," I used to stand about the churchyard on Sunday evenings when night was falling, comparing my own perspective with the windy marsh view, and making out some likeness between them by thinking how flat and low both were, and how on both there came an unknown way and a dark mist and then the sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
17  The truth was, that she had objected to me as an expensive companion who did Herbert no good, and that, when Herbert had first proposed to present me to her, she had received the proposal with such very moderate warmth, that Herbert had felt himself obliged to confide the state of the case to me, with a view to the lapse of a little time before I made her acquaintance.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
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