WALK in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - walk in Sense and Sensibility
1  Sir John wanted the whole family to walk to the Park directly and look at his guests.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
2  He dismounted, and giving his horse to his servant, walked back with them to Barton, whither he was purposely coming to visit them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
3  After staying with them half an hour, he asked Elinor to walk with him to Conduit Street, and introduce him to Sir John and Lady Middleton.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
4  They all looked exceedingly foolish; and Edward seemed to have as great an inclination to walk out of the room again, as to advance farther into it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
5  One morning, about a week after his leaving the country, Marianne was prevailed on to join her sisters in their usual walk, instead of wandering away by herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
6  She walked eagerly on as she spoke; and Elinor, to screen Marianne from particularity, as she felt almost certain of its not being Willoughby, quickened her pace and kept up with her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
7  They walked along the road through the valley, and chiefly in silence, for Marianne's MIND could not be controlled, and Elinor, satisfied with gaining one point, would not then attempt more.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
8  When breakfast was over she walked out by herself, and wandered about the village of Allenham, indulging the recollection of past enjoyment and crying over the present reverse for the chief of the morning.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
9  The carriage was at the door ready to take my poor cousins away, and they were just stepping in as he came off; poor Lucy in such a condition, he says, she could hardly walk; and Nancy, she was almost as bad.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
10  If her sisters intended to walk on the downs, she directly stole away towards the lanes; if they talked of the valley, she was as speedy in climbing the hills, and could never be found when the others set off.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
11  But at last a soft, genial morning appeared; such as might tempt the daughter's wishes and the mother's confidence; and Marianne, leaning on Elinor's arm, was authorised to walk as long as she could without fatigue, in the lane before the house.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
12  She had depended on a twilight walk to the Grecian temple, and perhaps all over the grounds, and an evening merely cold or damp would not have deterred her from it; but a heavy and settled rain even SHE could not fancy dry or pleasant weather for walking.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42
13  He could only obtain a promise of their calling at the Park within a day or two, and then left them in amazement at their indifference, to walk home and boast anew of their attractions to the Miss Steeles, as he had been already boasting of the Miss Steeles to them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
14  We will walk to the farm at the edge of the down, and see how the children go on; we will walk to Sir John's new plantations at Barton Cross, and the Abbeyland; and we will often go the old ruins of the Priory, and try to trace its foundations as far as we are told they once reached.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
15  Edward returned to them with fresh admiration of the surrounding country; in his walk to the village, he had seen many parts of the valley to advantage; and the village itself, in a much higher situation than the cottage, afforded a general view of the whole, which had exceedingly pleased him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
16  Elinor was obliged to turn from her, in the middle of her story, to receive the rest of the party; Lady Middleton introduced the two strangers; Mrs. Dashwood and Margaret came down stairs at the same time, and they all sat down to look at one another, while Mrs. Jennings continued her story as she walked through the passage into the parlour, attended by Sir John.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
17  Their visitors, except those from Barton Park, were not many; for, in spite of Sir John's urgent entreaties that they would mix more in the neighbourhood, and repeated assurances of his carriage being always at their service, the independence of Mrs. Dashwood's spirit overcame the wish of society for her children; and she was resolute in declining to visit any family beyond the distance of a walk.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
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