WATCH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - watch in Great Expectations
1  And his watch is a gold repeater, and worth a hundred pound if it's worth a penny.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXV
2  I read with my watch upon the table, purposing to close my book at eleven o'clock.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXXIX
3  He has a watch and a chain and a ring and a breast-pin and a handsome suit of clothes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XLII
4  Wemmick, having finished his breakfast, here looked at his watch, and began to get his coat on.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XLV
5  Like the clock in Miss Havisham's room, and like Miss Havisham's watch, it had stopped at twenty minutes to nine.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XI
6  All this made the feast delightful, and when the waiter was not there to watch me, my pleasure was without alloy.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXII
7  It was then I began to understand that everything in the room had stopped, like the watch and the clock, a long time ago.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter VIII
8  I then rejoined Mr. Wemmick, and affecting to consult my watch, and to be surprised by the information I had received, accepted his offer.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXXII
9  Wemmick stood with his watch in his hand until the moment was come for him to take the red-hot poker from the Aged, and repair to the battery.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXV
10  I had often watched a large dog of ours eating his food; and I now noticed a decided similarity between the dog's way of eating, and the man's.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter III
11  So successful a watch and ward had been established over the young lady by this judicious parent, that she had grown up highly ornamental, but perfectly helpless and useless.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIII
12  As I watched them while they all stood clustering about the forge, enjoying themselves so much, I thought what terrible good sauce for a dinner my fugitive friend on the marshes was.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter V
13  I could not help thinking that it might be harder if the butcher's time and attention were diverted from dear Mrs. Pocket; but I said nothing, and indeed had enough to do in keeping a bashful watch upon my company manners.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIII
14  Mr. Wemmick and I parted at the office in Little Britain, where suppliants for Mr. Jaggers's notice were lingering about as usual, and I returned to my watch in the street of the coach-office, with some three hours on hand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXXII
15  It was when I stood before her, avoiding her eyes, that I took note of the surrounding objects in detail, and saw that her watch had stopped at twenty minutes to nine, and that a clock in the room had stopped at twenty minutes to nine.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter VIII
16  Whenever I watched the vessels standing out to sea with their white sails spread, I somehow thought of Miss Havisham and Estella; and whenever the light struck aslant, afar off, upon a cloud or sail or green hillside or water-line, it was just the same.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XV
17  For all that I knew this perfectly well, I still felt as if it were not safe to let the coach-office be out of my sight longer than five minutes at a time; and in this condition of unreason I had performed the first half-hour of a watch of four or five hours, when Wemmick ran against me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXXII
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