WOMAN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - woman in Great Expectations
1  Very few men have the power of wrist that this woman has.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
2  Joe laid his hand upon my shoulder with the touch of a woman.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
3  And I felt absolutely certain that this woman was Estella's mother.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
4  She was a very handsome young woman, and I believe had some gypsy blood in her.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
5  A score or so of years ago, that woman was tried at the Old Bailey for murder, and was acquitted.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
6  That being the name I wanted, I knocked, and an elderly woman of a pleasant and thriving appearance responded.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVI
7  So convinced I was of that woman's being her mother, that I wanted no evidence to establish the fact in my own mind.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
8  She was not a good-looking woman, my sister; and I had a general impression that she must have made Joe Gargery marry her by hand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
9  An elderly woman, whom I had seen before as one of the servants who lived in the supplementary house across the back courtyard, opened the gate.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
10  I saw that the dress had been put upon the rounded figure of a young woman, and that the figure upon which it now hung loose had shrunk to skin and bone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
11  Now, there was no reasonable evidence to implicate any person but this woman, and on the improbabilities of her having been able to do it Mr. Jaggers principally rested his case.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
12  You did not gradually open your round childish eyes wider and wider to the discovery of that impostor of a woman who calculates her stores of peace of mind for when she wakes up in the night.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIII
13  Years afterwards, I made a dreadful likeness of that woman, by causing a face that had no other natural resemblance to it than it derived from flowing hair to pass behind a bowl of flaming spirits in a dark room.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
14  When I had taken leave of the pretty, gentle, dark-eyed girl, and of the motherly woman who had not outlived her honest sympathy with a little affair of true love, I felt as if the Old Green Copper Ropewalk had grown quite a different place.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVI
15  Mrs. Joe made occasional trips with Uncle Pumblechook on market-days, to assist him in buying such household stuffs and goods as required a woman's judgment; Uncle Pumblechook being a bachelor and reposing no confidences in his domestic servant.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
16  Miss Sarah Pocket, whom I now saw to be a little dry, brown, corrugated old woman, with a small face that might have been made of walnut-shells, and a large mouth like a cat's without the whiskers, supported this position by saying, "No, indeed, my dear."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
17  Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt kept an evening school in the village; that is to say, she was a ridiculous old woman of limited means and unlimited infirmity, who used to go to sleep from six to seven every evening, in the society of youth who paid two pence per week each, for the improving opportunity of seeing her do it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
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