WOMAN in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - woman in Sense and Sensibility
1  "You are a good woman," he warmly replied.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
2  I understand she is a woman of very good fortune.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
3  In his marrying such a woman therefore there would be nothing unsuitable.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
4  And Mrs. Jennings too, an exceedingly well-behaved woman, though not so elegant as her daughter.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
5  You will be under the care of a motherly good sort of woman, of whose kindness to you I can have no doubt.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
6  Mrs. Ferrars was a little, thin woman, upright, even to formality, in her figure, and serious, even to sourness, in her aspect.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
7  Mrs. Jennings, Lady Middleton's mother, was a good-humoured, merry, fat, elderly woman, who talked a great deal, seemed very happy, and rather vulgar.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
8  It is very right that you SHOULD go to town; I would have every young woman of your condition in life acquainted with the manners and amusements of London.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
9  They had not remained in this manner long, before Elinor perceived Willoughby, standing within a few yards of them, in earnest conversation with a very fashionable looking young woman.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
10  Marianne told her, with the greatest delight, that Willoughby had given her a horse, one that he had bred himself on his estate in Somersetshire, and which was exactly calculated to carry a woman.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
11  Luckily Lady Middleton's mother had arrived at Barton within the last hour, and as she was a very cheerful agreeable woman, he hoped the young ladies would not find it so very dull as they might imagine.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
12  It would be impossible, I know," replied Elinor, "to convince you that a woman of seven and twenty could feel for a man of thirty-five anything near enough to love, to make him a desirable companion to her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
13  Whereas, in my opinion, by her taking so much notice of you, and treating you in this kind of way, she has given you a sort of claim on her future consideration, which a conscientious woman would not disregard.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
14  As it was impossible, however, now to prevent their coming, Lady Middleton resigned herself to the idea of it, with all the philosophy of a well-bred woman, contenting herself with merely giving her husband a gentle reprimand on the subject five or six times every day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
15  She was not a woman of many words; for, unlike people in general, she proportioned them to the number of her ideas; and of the few syllables that did escape her, not one fell to the share of Miss Dashwood, whom she eyed with the spirited determination of disliking her at all events.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
16  A woman of seven and twenty," said Marianne, after pausing a moment, "can never hope to feel or inspire affection again, and if her home be uncomfortable, or her fortune small, I can suppose that she might bring herself to submit to the offices of a nurse, for the sake of the provision and security of a wife.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
17  To quit the neighbourhood of Norland was no longer an evil; it was an object of desire; it was a blessing, in comparison of the misery of continuing her daughter-in-law's guest; and to remove for ever from that beloved place would be less painful than to inhabit or visit it while such a woman was its mistress.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
18  Mrs. Jennings laughed heartily; and Elinor found that in her resolution to know where they had been, she had actually made her own woman enquire of Mr. Willoughby's groom; and that she had by that method been informed that they had gone to Allenham, and spent a considerable time there in walking about the garden and going all over the house.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
19  She took the first opportunity of affronting her mother-in-law on the occasion, talking to her so expressively of her brother's great expectations, of Mrs. Ferrars's resolution that both her sons should marry well, and of the danger attending any young woman who attempted to DRAW HIM IN; that Mrs. Dashwood could neither pretend to be unconscious, nor endeavor to be calm.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
20  In the mean time, till all these alterations could be made from the savings of an income of five hundred a-year by a woman who never saved in her life, they were wise enough to be contented with the house as it was; and each of them was busy in arranging their particular concerns, and endeavoring, by placing around them books and other possessions, to form themselves a home.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6