WORK in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - work in Great Expectations
1  Biddy dropped her work, and looked at me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
2  The subject still held them when Joe came in from his work to have a cup of tea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
3  Dolge Orlick was at work and present, next day, when I reminded Joe of my half-holiday.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
4  Drat that boy," interposed my sister, frowning at me over her work, "what a questioner he is.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
5  I made out from this, that the work I had to do, was to walk Miss Havisham round and round the room.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
6  Howsever they come, they didn't ought to come, and they come from the father of lies, and work round to the same.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
7  "I'd be a match for all noodles and all rogues," returned my sister, beginning to work herself into a mighty rage.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
8  She put her hand, which was a comfortable hand though roughened by work, upon my hands, one after another, and gently took them out of my hair.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
9  For I called to mind now, that she was equally accomplished in the terms of our trade, and the names of our different sorts of work, and our various tools.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
10  His getting on his box, which I remember to have been decorated with an old weather-stained pea-green hammercloth moth-eaten into rags, was quite a work of time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
11  I was haunted by the fear that she would, sooner or later, find me out, with a black face and hands, doing the coarsest part of my work, and would exult over me and despise me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
12  Whether Mr. Trabb's local work would have sat more gracefully on him than on me, may be a question; but I am conscious that he carried off his rather old clothes much better than I carried off my new suit.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
13  'Consequence, my father didn't make objections to my going to work; so I went to work at my present calling, which were his too, if he would have followed it, and I worked tolerable hard, I assure you, Pip.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
14  I thought it would be very good for me if I could get her out of my head, with all the rest of those remembrances and fancies, and could go to work determined to relish what I had to do, and stick to it, and make the best of it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
15  'Consequence, my mother and me we ran away from my father several times; and then my mother she'd go out to work, and she'd say, "Joe," she'd say, "now, please God, you shall have some schooling, child," and she'd put me to school.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
16  When these points were settled, and so far carried out as that I had begun to work in earnest, it occurred to me that if I could retain my bedroom in Barnard's Inn, my life would be agreeably varied, while my manners would be none the worse for Herbert's society.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
17  In a back room, a high-shouldered man with a face-ache tied up in dirty flannel, who was dressed in old black clothes that bore the appearance of having been waxed, was stooping over his work of making fair copies of the notes of the other two gentlemen, for Mr. Jaggers's own use.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
18  He never even seemed to come to his work on purpose, but would slouch in as if by mere accident; and when he went to the Jolly Bargemen to eat his dinner, or went away at night, he would slouch out, like Cain or the Wandering Jew, as if he had no idea where he was going and no intention of ever coming back.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
19  Biddy nodded her head thoughtfully at the fire as she took up her work again, and said she would be very particular; and Joe, still detaining his knees, said, "Ay, ay, I'll be ekervally partickler, Pip;" and then they congratulated me again, and went on to express so much wonder at the notion of my being a gentleman that I didn't half like it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
20  When he had at last done and had appointed to send the articles to Mr. Pumblechook's on the Thursday evening, he said, with his hand upon the parlor lock, "I know, sir, that London gentlemen cannot be expected to patronize local work, as a rule; but if you would give me a turn now and then in the quality of a townsman, I should greatly esteem it."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX