100 Words with Uncommon Meaning

They are 100 common words with uncommon meaning; we select example sentences from recent English media, like Economics and BBC, most of them are for academic reading. The list is updated weekly to help readers refresh hot usage of common words.
 100 Common Words with Uncommon Meaning and Sentence
buffet  Speak
v.
(especially of wind or waves) strike repeatedly and violently
The Cambridge-area innovation hub has been buffeted by the events of the past year but also shown great resilience and creativity.
pressing  Speak
a.
requiring quick or immediate action or attention
This work originated as a new project developed in the MIT Catalyst program, a program designed to nucleate projects that solve pressing clinical needs.
edge  Speak
n.
an advantage over other people
This knowledge we’re developing can apply to so many applications down the road, like in water harvesting, and I feel like we're getting the edge over the other competitors.
tract  Speak
n.
a major passage in the body, a large bundle of nerve fibers
Many viruses infect their hosts through mucosal surfaces such as the lining of the respiratory tract.
sidestep  Speak
v.
avoid (someone or something) by stepping sideways
Computer-generated holography sidesteps these challenges by simulating the optical setup, but the process can be a computational slog.
approach  Speak
v.
speak to (someone) for the first time about something, typically with a proposal or request
Fifty-one patients were approached in the waiting room or a triage tent and asked if they would be willing to participate in the study.
headwind  Speak
n.
a force or influence opposing forward motion; a wind blowing from directly in front
He said that while it is possible the Federal Reserve may turn more dovish at its March, April, and June meetings, there are headwinds.
motor  Speak
n.
a source of power, energy, or motive force
Leon is a precocious kid, which provides the motor for the novel as his innocence stands in stark contrast to the evil of the old man he converses with.
stem  Speak
v.
prevent, stop, or deter
With a highly transmissible new variant of the virus surging across Britain, Johnson is rushing out vaccines faster than the country’s neighbors in a bid to stem the pandemic.
work out  Speak
v.
solve a problem by doing a calculation
It all works out to fewer New Year’s babies; the baby bust could mean some 320,000 children who statistically would have likely been born in 2021 but won't because of the pandemic.
enforcer  Speak
n.
a person or group that compels observance of or compliance with a law
After years of inaction from enforcers that left so much legal territory uncharted, there’s a chance to start drawing a map.
tally  Speak
v.
calculate the total number of
They demanded recounts in every state using the Dominion Voting Systems vote-tallying machine software, especially in key battlefield states that are under scrutiny.
sport  Speak
v.
wear or display
Cit0Day could be considered a reincarnation of LeakedSource; however, it went down on September 14, when the site's domain sported an FBI seizure notice.
grid  Speak
n.
a network of cables or pipes for distributing power, especially high-voltage transmission lines
Their work has the potential to touch every corner of life, including every area of energy, from improving energy efficiency to bolstering grid security.
spill  Speak
v.
spread profusely or beyond bounds
On Oct. 14, files purportedly from the mysterious laptop spilled into public view in the New York Post.
ranger  Speak
n.
a keeper of a park, forest, or area of countryside
We were not able to undertake regular conservation, such as managing flower-rich meadows, and rangers now forced to spend time to manage safety.
soar  Speak
v.
quickly increases by a great deal
With increased mobility and reduced adherence to social distancing, mask wearing, and personal hygiene, the virus will soar again.
electrified  Speak
a.
having a sudden sense of great excitement, thrilled
Despite my caution, I soon feel a sensation on my back, somewhere between being pricked and electrified and wriggle in shock.
circus  Speak
n.
something noisy and confused
The media circus around the case comes at a time when India faces a host of critical issues.
grounds  Speak
n.
(pl) factors forming a basis for action or the justification for a belief
A series of indictments against these researchers suggest the suspicions of US authorities have some grounds.
hashtag  Speak
n.
a word or phrase preceded by a hash sign, used on social media to identify messages on a specific topic
The restaurant caused an uproar on Chinese social media, hashtags about it have been viewed more than 300 million times on the social platform Weibo.
brand  Speak
v.
consider or refer to something as being bad
The Hong Kong government branded the move blatant and barbaric interference in the internal affairs of China.
afloat  Speak
a.
out of debt or difficulty
Alcott was living in a basement apartment with her family, and they were struggling to stay afloat; even then, her prose was impressive.
shield  Speak
v.
protect someone or something from a danger
The same issue crops up in deciding who should be shielding and whether some people need extra protection in the workplace.
devour  Speak
v.
read books or literature quickly and eagerly
As a little girl, Sullivan was already devouring every newspaper she could find on the subject; it was a time when the Mercury Seven were propelling the image of astronauts into America's mind.
grouse  Speak
v.
complain pettily; grumble
Trump has groused that finding another location to host G7 summit will cost the country a fortune, following an outpouring of criticism.
brace  Speak
v.
support an object in order to stop it from falling down
Moscow's mayor cautioned against complacency, saying Russians to brace for a grueling phase of the pandemic in the weeks ahead.
stage  Speak
v.
evaluate a patient to determine the phase, severity, or progression of a disease
The man's condition, doctors told the BBC deteriorated briefly and he had to be put on a ventilator for 24 hours, before staging a remarkable recovery.
stand  Speak
n.
a small often open-air structure for a small retail business
Some people flouted the lockdown by reopening shops and taking family strolls; some grocery stands and bakeries stayed open.
ready  Speak
v.
prepare someone or something for an activity or purpose
Since the 9/11 attacks, New York City has been preparing makeshift mortuary space, readying refrigerated lorries to help hospitals as the death toll rises.
stellar  Speak
a.
of an extremely high standard
The company announced that in addition to its preexisting library, it would be curating two new playlists for anyone hoping to binge-watch some seriously stellar performances.
kick  Speak
v.
run at a faster speed during the last part of a race
The new rules kicked in Friday to combat the coronavirus pandemic, but we worried that the clogged situation at O’Hare is making the spread of the virus more likely.
contain  Speak
v.
control or restrain
We are not out of the woods because the virus can apparently be transmitted when people have few symptoms and very difficult to be contained.
row  Speak
n.
a noisy acrimonious quarrel
It resulted in confusion amid dramatic changes to the reported figures for two days in a row, and dampening hopes that the outbreak may peak later this month.
grant  Speak
n.
a sum of money given by an organization, especially a government
Federal prosecutors charged multiple scientists working in the USA with hiding research grants from Beijing and with pilfering research that could be used for China's economic gain.
spearhead  Speak
v.
lead an attack or movement
In the public statement about the spearheading's death, the prime minister said he had been responsible for a pattern of disruptive, destabilizing behavior in the region.